Brown v. Board of Education (1954) eLesson

February 18th, 2014 by

After the Civil War, the Fourteenth Amendment was passed to grant citizenship to former slaves and protect them from civil rights violations in their home states. Public schools were relatively rare throughout the United States, but were often segregated by race where they existed. The same Congress that passed the Fourteenth Amendment created racially segregated Read more…

The Constitutionality of Affirmative Action

September 23rd, 2013 by

The Constitutionality of Affirmative Action Affirmative action has long been perceived as a necessary means of making amends for the history of racism in the United States. Over time, there have been several challenges to the constitutionality of affirmative action policies, prompting the question: Do such policies violate the 14th Amendment’s Equal Protection Clause under Read more…

Brown v. Board of Education eLesson

February 21st, 2013 by

Brown v. Board of Education, 1954 eLesson Celebrate Black History month with materials on two landmark Supreme Court cases on the Fourteenth Amendment’s Equal Protection Clause. How could the same words have been interpreted so differently in Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) and sixty years later in Brown v. Board of Education (1954)? Read some background Read more…

Brown v. Board (1954): The Issue Endures

February 19th, 2013 by

Brown v. Board (1954): The Issue Endures  

Brown v. Board of Education, Document I: Unanimous Majority Opinion

January 28th, 2013 by

Brown v. Board of Education, Document I: Unanimous Majority Opinion Do you use document-based questions in your classroom? This winter the Bill of Rights Institute is blogging a document-based question on the Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education (1954). Each weekly post will feature an excerpted document related to the case, along with some questions Read more…

Brown v. Board of Education, Document H: Segregation Laws Map (1953)

January 22nd, 2013 by

Brown v. Board of Education, Document H: Segregation Laws Map (1953) Do you use document-based questions in your classroom? This winter the Bill of Rights Institute is blogging a document-based question on the Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education (1954). Each weekly post will feature an excerpted document related to the case, along with some Read more…

Brown v. Board of Education, Document D: Dissenting Opinion, Plessy v. Ferguson (1896)

December 5th, 2012 by

Brown v. Board of Education, Document D: Dissenting Opinion, Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) Do you use document-based questions in your classroom? This fall the Bill of Rights Institute is blogging a document-based question on the Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education (1954). Each weekly post will feature an excerpted document related to the case, along Read more…

Brown v. Board of Education: Document C, Majority Opinion, Plessy v. Ferguson (1896)

November 26th, 2012 by

Brown v. Board of Education: Document C, Majority Opinion, Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) Do you use document-based questions in your classroom? This fall the Bill of Rights Institute is blogging a document-based question on the Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education (1954). Each weekly post will feature an excerpted document related to the case, along Read more…

Brown v. Board of Education: Document B, Section of the Fourteenth Amendment (1868)

November 12th, 2012 by

Brown v. Board of Education: Document B, Section of the Fourteenth Amendment (1868) Do you use document-based questions in your classroom? This fall the Bill of Rights Institute is blogging a document-based question on the Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education (1954). Each weekly post will feature an excerpted document related to the case, along Read more…

Fire in a Crowded Theater – The Origins of a Limit on Free Speech

November 7th, 2012 by

Fire in a Crowded Theater – The Origins of a Limit on Free Speech In discussions of the First Amendment and the limits of free speech, it is common to hear references to Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes’s famous quote from Schenck v. U.S. 1919 – “The most stringent protection of free speech would not protect Read more…