The President’s Inaugural Address Activity

The President’s Inaugural Address Activity On Monday, January 21, 2013, the public inauguration of President Barack Obama was held in front of the United States Capitol.  President Obama promised many changes and improvements during his address, but does the Executive Branch have the constitutional power to enact these promises? Have your students decide! 1. Break Read more…

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Brown v. Board of Education, Document H: Segregation Laws Map (1953)

Brown v. Board of Education, Document H: Segregation Laws Map (1953) Do you use document-based questions in your classroom? This winter the Bill of Rights Institute is blogging a document-based question on the Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education (1954). Each weekly post will feature an excerpted document related to the case, along with some Read more…

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Inauguration Day 2013

Inauguration Day 2013 The official start of President Obama’s second term is fast approaching. Learn more about the history and meaning of Inauguration Day with this lesson packed with engaging and informative resources! Test your knowledge of the countdown to Inauguration Day, analyze the Oath of Office, identify inaugural speeches from American history, and think Read more…

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Current Events and the Constitution: Supreme Court Roundup

Current Events and the Constitution: Supreme Court Roundup The 2012 – 2013 Supreme Court term is in full swing, and there are are many cases that deal with important questions of constitutional law on the docket. Use the following resources and discussion questions to analyze and discuss the issues with your students. Explore these and Read more…

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Brown v. Board of Education, Document G: “Crowded Segregated Classroom,” ca. 1940s

Brown v. Board of Education, Document G: “Crowded Segregated Classroom,” ca. 1940s Do you use document-based questions in your classroom? This winter the Bill of Rights Institute is blogging a document-based question on the Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education (1954). Each weekly post will feature an excerpted document related to the case, along with Read more…

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Brown v. Board of Education, Document F: “African American Schoolgirls in Classroom, Learning to Sew,” (1899)

Brown v. Board of Education, Document F: “African American Schoolgirls in Classroom, Learning to Sew,” (1899) Do you use document-based questions in your classroom? This fall the Bill of Rights Institute is blogging several document-based questions on the Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education (1954). Each weekly post will feature an excerpted document related to Read more…

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Searching for the Fourth Amendment eLesson

Bill of Rights in the News: Searching for the Fourth Amendment The steady march of science and technology has a way of bringing settled law into new areas, challenging what was once convention. An upcoming court case involves just such a predicament – whether or not the government can search your laptop or cell phone Read more…

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Brown v. Board of Education, Document E: “Washington, D.C. Public Schools, 1st Div-Class Making Geometric Forms with Paper,” (1899)

Brown v. Board of Education, Document E: “Washington, D.C. Public Schools, 1st Div-Class Making Geometric Forms with Paper,” (1899) Do you use document-based questions in your classroom? This fall the Bill of Rights Institute is blogging a document-based question on the Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education (1954). Each weekly post will feature an excerpted Read more…

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Brown v. Board of Education, Document D: Dissenting Opinion, Plessy v. Ferguson (1896)

Brown v. Board of Education, Document D: Dissenting Opinion, Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) Do you use document-based questions in your classroom? This fall the Bill of Rights Institute is blogging a document-based question on the Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education (1954). Each weekly post will feature an excerpted document related to the case, along Read more…

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Are They Watching You? eLesson

Are They Watching You? eLesson The Constitutional principle of due process, which holds that government must interact with citizens according to duly‑enacted laws, balances the rights of suspects with public safety. The Fourth Amendment was added to the Constitution to ensure we would be protected from unreasonable searches and seizures. But do all searches require Read more…

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