Snowden and the NSA eLesson

Snowden and the NSA A mere nine months ago no one knew the name Edward Snowden. Now not a week goes by without a news story related to his revelations about the National Security Agency (NSA). No doubt your class has already begun to ponder the implications of NSA information gathering and what it says Read more…

Read More


John Adams- Blog Post

John Adams “There is danger from all men. The only maxim of a free government ought to be to trust no man living with power to endanger the public liberty.” - 1772 Short, overweight, and quick-tongued, John Adams hardly fits the model of the typical Founder. But Adams’s contributions to American independence and the formation of Read more…

Read More


Brown v. Board of Education (1954) eLesson

After the Civil War, the Fourteenth Amendment was passed to grant citizenship to former slaves and protect them from civil rights violations in their home states. Public schools were relatively rare throughout the United States, but were often segregated by race where they existed. The same Congress that passed the Fourteenth Amendment created racially segregated Read more…

Read More


Abigail Adams- Blog Post

Abigail Adams “If particular care and attention is not paid to the ladies, we are determined to foment a rebellion, and will not hold ourselves bound by any laws in which we have no voice or representation.” 1776 Abigail Smith Adams was born in Massachusetts, a descendant of the distinguished Quincy family. Though Abigail received no Read more…

Read More


Free Speech Week

Free Speech Week It just seems to be a human trait to want to protect the speech of people with whom we agree. For the First Amendment, that is not good enough. So it is really important that we protect First Amendment rights of people no matter what side of the line they are on. Read more…

Read More


America’s Founders – Blog Post

  Which Founder are you? The founding of the United States was marked by an opposition to rule by powerful monarchs and elites. After the American Revolution, prominent leaders in the colonies came together to design a limited government with checks and balances which would protect the rights of its citizens. Fittingly, no one person Read more…

Read More


Seward’s Folly

Seward’s Folly On this day in 1867 the United States officially took possession of the territory of Alaska after purchasing it from the Russian Empire. In the aftermath of the Crimean War, Russia feared that in future conflicts with Britain Alaska would be difficult to defend. The Russian Empire was badly in need of funds Read more…

Read More


The Constitutionality of Affirmative Action

The Constitutionality of Affirmative Action Affirmative action has long been perceived as a necessary means of making amends for the history of racism in the United States. Over time, there have been several challenges to the constitutionality of affirmative action policies, prompting the question: Do such policies violate the 14th Amendment’s Equal Protection Clause under Read more…

Read More


Free Speech on Campus

Free Speech on Campus The right to free speech is one of the most treasured in academia. The ability to express one’s opinions without fear of reprisal from those in power is what enables the free flow of ideas. However not all free speech is valued equally. Restrictive speech codes have many pointing towards a Read more…

Read More


How One Teacher Uses Bill of Rights Institutes’ Teaching with Current Events

How One Teacher Uses Bill of Rights Institutes’ Teaching with Current Events Valencia Abbott, a Social Studies teacher at Rockingham Early College High School in Wentworth, North Carolina, shared how she uses the Teaching with Current Events resource at BillofRightsInstitute.org. Ms. Abbott believes that the study of current events is an invigorating way to encompass Read more…

Read More