Time for a Career Shift? Do What the Founders Did!

April 15th, 2014 by

Time for a Career Shift? Do What the Founders Did! Many of the Founders were true Renaissance men, excelling at many different careers throughout their lives. Washington was a surveyor, soldier, and then farmer. Franklin was printer, scientist, and then philanthropist.  Wilson was a teacher, lawyer, and then politician. Have you thought about your next Read more…

Snowden and the NSA eLesson

April 9th, 2014 by

Snowden and the NSA A mere nine months ago no one knew the name Edward Snowden. Now not a week goes by without a news story related to his revelations about the National Security Agency (NSA). No doubt your class has already begun to ponder the implications of NSA information gathering and what it says Read more…

Brown v. Board of Education (1954) eLesson

February 18th, 2014 by

After the Civil War, the Fourteenth Amendment was passed to grant citizenship to former slaves and protect them from civil rights violations in their home states. Public schools were relatively rare throughout the United States, but were often segregated by race where they existed. The same Congress that passed the Fourteenth Amendment created racially segregated Read more…

How One Teacher Uses Bill of Rights Institutes’ Teaching with Current Events

June 4th, 2013 by

How One Teacher Uses Bill of Rights Institutes’ Teaching with Current Events Valencia Abbott, a Social Studies teacher at Rockingham Early College High School in Wentworth, North Carolina, shared how she uses the Teaching with Current Events resource at BillofRightsInstitute.org. Ms. Abbott believes that the study of current events is an invigorating way to encompass Read more…

George Mason: In His Own Words eLesson

May 28th, 2013 by

George Mason: In His Own Words Although your school year might be winding down, at this time in 1787 the Founders were just getting started at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia.  Learn more about Founder George Mason in this week’s eLesson. George Mason’s ideas helped to shape the Founding documents of the United States, but Read more…

Learn More About Gouverneur Morris eLesson

April 30th, 2013 by

Learn More About Gouverneur Morris eLesson Our latest eLesson is now available.  Sign up to have our eLessons emailed directly to you! Though James Madison has been given the title, “Father of the Constitution,” a case could be made that Gouverneur Morris was second in importance only to the Virginian in shaping the final version Read more…

Toast the Constitution!

March 19th, 2013 by

Toast the Constitution! Bring the people, places, and history of the Prohibition Era alive with these new interactive lessons. In “The Rise and Fall of Prohibition,” your students will learn about the background of the 18th Amendment, the individuals who fought for and against Prohibition, and its eventual repeal. They will use their new knowledge Read more…

Brown v. Board of Education eLesson

February 21st, 2013 by

Brown v. Board of Education, 1954 eLesson Celebrate Black History month with materials on two landmark Supreme Court cases on the Fourteenth Amendment’s Equal Protection Clause. How could the same words have been interpreted so differently in Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) and sixty years later in Brown v. Board of Education (1954)? Read some background Read more…

The President’s Inaugural Address Activity

January 24th, 2013 by

The President’s Inaugural Address Activity On Monday, January 21, 2013, the public inauguration of President Barack Obama was held in front of the United States Capitol.  President Obama promised many changes and improvements during his address, but does the Executive Branch have the constitutional power to enact these promises? Have your students decide! 1. Break Read more…

Are They Watching You? eLesson

November 27th, 2012 by

Are They Watching You? eLesson The Constitutional principle of due process, which holds that government must interact with citizens according to duly‑enacted laws, balances the rights of suspects with public safety. The Fourth Amendment was added to the Constitution to ensure we would be protected from unreasonable searches and seizures. But do all searches require Read more…